getpdf  NLM-PubMed-Logo  doi: 10.17113/ftb.55.02.17.4789 

Tween® 20-Enhanced Bioreduction of Acetophenones Promoted by Daucus carota Root



Monique Rodrigues da Costasmall orcid_display_4pp  and Álvaro Takeo Omori*small orcid_display_4pp


Center for Natural Sciences and Humanities, Federal University of ABC – UFABC, Av. dos Estados 5001, CEP 09210-580, Santo André, SP, Brazil




Article history:
Received May 13, 2016
Accepted March 16, 2017
cc



Key words:
biocatalysis, carrot root, surfactants, chiral alcohols



Summary:
The effect of surfactants on the bioreduction of acetophenones mediated by carrot (Daucus carota) root was investigated. Among the tested surfactants, Tween® 20 slightly improved the conversion. The amount of surfactant was optimised, and the presented methodology was applied to other substituted acetophenones, which led to the preparation of their respective optically enriched 1-phenylethanols with high conversion levels and high enantioselectivities.





*Corresponding author:  email3  alvaro.omori@ufabc.edu.br
                                          tel3  +55 11 4996 0177





getpdf  NLM-PubMed-Logo  doi: 10.17113/ftb.55.02.17.5009 

Production of γ-Decalactone by Yeast Strains under Different Conditions



Dayana Pereira de Andrade1small orcid_display_4pp, Beatriz Ferreira Carvalho2small orcid_display_4pp, Rosane Freitas Schwan1small orcid_display_4pp and Disney Ribeiro Dias3*small orcid_display_4pp


1Department of Biology, Federal University of Lavras, Campus Universitario, BR-37200-000, Lavras, MG, Brazil
2Department of Animal Science, Federal University of Lavras, Campus Universitario, BR-37200-000, Lavras, MG, Brazil
3Department of Food Science, Federal University of Lavras, Campus Universitario, BR-37200-000, Lavras, MG, Brazil




Article history:
Received October 2, 2016
Accepted April 19, 2017
cc


Key words:
castor oil, crude glycerol, Lindnera saturnus, microbial γ-decalactone, Yarrowia lipolytica


Summary:
γ-Decalactone is a flavour compound that when obtained by biotechnological production using microorganisms is classified as natural. The aim of this study is to evaluate various conditions for γ-decalactone production by tropical yeast strains Yarrowia lipolytica CCMA 0242 and Lindnera saturnus CCMA 0243. The growth of and γ-decalactone production by Y. lipolytica CCMA 0242 were higher in castor oil than in glycerol. γ-Decalactone production in single batch or fed-batch fermentation did not differ significantly. The γ-decalactone production by L. saturnus CCMA 0243 was better at initial pH=5, while the production by Y. lipolytica CCMA 0242 was better at initial pH=6. The yeast L. saturnus CCMA 0243 produced more γ-decalactone than Y. lipolytica CCMA 0242 under the same fermentation conditions. The crude glycerol was not an alternative substrate for γ-decalactone production by Y. lipolytica CCMA 0242. Castor oil at volume fraction of 30 % showed better results as a substrate. The strain L. saturnus CCMA 0243 showed better results of γ-decalactone production. This yeast species can be considered an alternative producer of γ-decalactone in biotechnological processes.




*Corresponding author:  email3  diasdr@dca.ufla.br
                                          tel3  +55 35 38 295 256




getpdf  NLM-PubMed-Logo  doi: 10.17113/ftb.55.02.17.4958

Extracellular Alkaline Lipase from a Novel Fungus Curvularia sp. DHE 5: Optimisation of Physicochemical Parameters, Partial Purification and Characterisation



Dina Helmy El-Ghonemy1*small orcid_display_4pp, Mamdouh S. El-Gamal2small orcid_display_4pp, Amir Elsayed Tantawy1small orcid_display_4pp and Thanaa Hamed Ali1small orcid_display_4pp


1Department of Microbial Chemistry, Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Division, National Research Centre, 33 El Buhouth St., EG-12 622 Giza, Egypt
2Botany and Microbiology Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, EG-11 884 Nasr City, Egypt



Article history:
Received August 18, 2016
Accepted April 4, 2017
cc


Key words:
lipase, Curvularia sp. DHE 5, optimisation of culture conditions, agro-industrial residues, lipase characterisation


Summary:
Thirty isolated fungal strains were screened for lipase production using Phenol Red plates, containing tributyrin as lipidic substrate, and a novel fungus identified genetically as Curvularia sp. DHE 5 was found as the most prominent strain. Various agro-industrial substrates were evaluated as inert supports for lipase production in solid-state fermentation. The highest yield of lipase ((83.4±2.2) U/g on dry mass basis) was reported with wheat bran medium after seven days of fermentation at pH=7.0, temperature of 30 °C, 70 % moisture content, inoculum size of 1.27·107 spore/mL and 2 % olive oil as an inducer. Supplementation of the medium with 0.05 % KCl as an ion source further increased lipase production to (88.9±1.2) U/g on dry mass basis. The enzyme was partially purified through ammonium sulphate fractionation (40 %) followed by dialysis, and its optimum pH and temperature were reported at 8.0 and 50 °C, respectively, with remarkable pH and thermal stability.




*Corresponding author:  email3  delghonamy@yahoo.com
                                          tel3  +2 010 6245 6850




getpdf  NLM-PubMed-Logo  doi: 10.17113/ftb.55.02.17.4378

Brewery Waste Reuse for Protease Production by Lactic Acid Fermentation



Thiago Rocha dos Santos Mathias1*small orcid_display_4pp, Paula Fernandes de Aguiar2small orcid_display_4pp, Joao Batista de Almeida e Silva3small orcid_display_4pp, Pedro Paulo Moretzsohn de Mello4small orcid_display_4pp and Eliana Flávia Camporese Sérvulo5small orcid_display_4pp


1Laboratory of Fermentation Technology, Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology of Rio de Janeiro, Senador Furtado Street 121, BR-20270-021 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil
2Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Athos da Silveira Ramos 149, BR-21941-909 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil
3Pilot Plant of Beverages, Department of Biotechnology, Engineering School of Lorena, University of Sao Paulo, BR-12602-810 Lorena, Sao Paulo, Brazil
4Technology Center of Food and Beverage – SENAI, Nilo Peçanha Street 85, BR-27700-000 Vassouras, RJ, Brazil
5Laboratory of Industrial Microbiology, Department of Biochemical Engineering, School of Chemistry, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Athos da Silveira Ramos 149, BR-21941-909 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil




Article history:
Received July 29, 2015
Accepted December 9, 2016
cc



Key words:
brewery waste, waste reuse, lactic fermentation, proteolytic enzymes


Summary:
This study evaluated the use of three solid brewery wastes: brewer’s spent grain, hot trub and residual brewer’s yeast, as alternative media for the cultivation of lactic acid bacteria to evaluate their potential for proteolytic enzyme production. Initially, a mixture experimental design was used to evaluate the effect of each residue, as well as different mixtures (with the protein content set at 4 %) in the enzyme production. At predetermined intervals, the solid and liquid fractions were separated and the extracellular proteolytic activity was determined. After selecting the best experimental conditions, a second experiment, factorial experimental design, was developed in order to evaluate the protein content in the media (1 to 7 %) and the addition of fermentable sugar (glucose, 1 to 7 %). Among the wastes, residual yeast showed the highest potential for the production of extracellular enzymes, generating a proteolytic extract with 2.6 U/mL in 3 h. However, due to the low content of the fermentable sugars in the medium, the addition of glucose also had a positive effect, increasing the proteolytic activity to 4.9 U/mL. The best experimental conditions of each experimental design were reproduced for comparison, and the enzyme content was separated by ethanol precipitation. The best medium produced a precipitated protein with proteolytic activity of 145.5 U/g.





*Corresponding author:  email3   thiago.mathias@ifrj.edu.br
                                          tel3  +55 21 2566 7772
                                          fax2  +55 21 3938 7567




getpdf  NLM-PubMed-Logo  doi: 10.17113/ftb.55.02.17.4942 

Hybrid Drying of Carrot Preliminary Processed with Ultrasonically Assisted Osmotic Dehydration


Dominik Mierzwa*small orcid_display_4pp, Stefan Jan Kowalskismall orcid_display_4pp and Joanna Kroehnkesmall orcid_display_4pp


Poznań University of Technology, Department of Process Engineering, Institute of Technology and Chemical Engineering, ul. Berdychowo 4, PL-60-965 Poznań, Poland


Article history:
Received August 9, 2016
Accepted February 22, 2017
cc


Key words:
osmotic dehydration, ultrasound, microwaves, hybrid drying, dry product colour


Summary:
In this paper the kinetics of osmotic dehydration of carrot and the influence of this pretreatment on the post-drying processes and the quality of obtained products are analysed. Osmotic dehydration was carried out in the aqueous fructose solution in two different ways: with and without ultrasound assistance. In the first part of the research, the kinetics of osmotic dehydration was analysed on the basis of osmotic dewatering rate, water loss and solid gain. Next, the effective time of dehydration was determined and in the second part of research samples were initially dehydrated for 30 min and dried. Five different procedures of drying were established on the grounds of convective method enhanced with microwave and infrared radiation. The influence of osmotic dehydration on the drying kinetics and final product quality was analysed. It was found that it did not influence the drying kinetics significantly but positively affected the final product quality. Negligible influence on the drying kinetics was attributed to solid uptake, which may block the pores, hindering heat and mass transfer. It was also concluded that the application of microwave and/or infrared radiation during convective drying significantly influenced the kinetics of the final stage of drying. A proper combination of aforementioned techniques of hybrid drying allows reducing the drying time. Differences between the particular dehydration methods and drying schedules were discussed.




*Corresponding author:  email3  dominik.mierzwa@put.poznan.pl
                                          tel3  +48 61 665 3969



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