getpdf

Distribution of Nutrients in Edible Banana Pulp

Markus Forster1, Elena Rodríguez Rodríguez1, Jacinto Darias Martín2 and Carlos Díaz Romero1*


1
Department of Analytical Chemistry, Nutrition and Food Science, University of La Laguna, E-38201 Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Spain

2Department of Chemical Engineering, University of La Laguna, E-38201 Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Spain

Article history:

Received: June 07, 2002
Accepted: April 24, 2003

Key words:

bananas, chemical composition, parts of banana pulp

Summary:

Chemical composition in different parts of banana pulp was determined. Ash and protein mean concentrations in the central part of the pulp were higher than in the medium part, and these were higher than those in the external part. The mean concentrations of the fiber (total and non-soluble) in the central part were higher than those found in the other parts. Ascorbic acid behaved inversely; the mean concentration significantly decreased from the external part to the central part. The central part contained the highest mean concentrations of the analysed minerals (Na, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Cu, Zn and Mn), with statistically significant differences for Cu, Zn and Ca. A tendency to differentiate the pulp samples of banana as a function of the part considered was observed after using factor analysis. The samples from the central part were different from those from the external part. The samples of the medium part overlapped with those of the other two parts.



*Corresponding author:           jdarias@ull.es
                                               ++34 922 318 522
                                               ++34 922 318 523

Search FTB


Follow us


 facebook 1 twitter bird_icon

 

QR Code


qrcode

We use cookies to improve our website and your experience when using it. Cookies used for the essential operation of the site have already been set. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

I accept cookies from this site.

EU Cookie Directive Module Information