getpdf  NLM-PubMed-Logo  doi: 10.17113/ftb.56.01.18.5491 

Applications of Microbial Enzymes in Food Industry


Sindhu Raveendran1*small orcid_display_4pp, Binod Parameswaran1
small orcid_display_4pp, Sabeela Beevi Ummalyma1,2small orcid_display_4pp, Amith Abraham1small orcid_display_4pp, Anil Kuruvilla Mathew1small orcid_display_4pp, Aravind Madhavan3small orcid_display_4pp, Sharrel Rebello4small orcid_display_4pp and Ashok Pandey5small orcid_display_4pp


1Centre for Biofuels, National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology, CSIR, 695019 Trivandrum, India
2Institute of Bioresources and Sustainable Development, 795001 Imphal, India
3Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology, 695014 Trivandrum, India
4Communicable Disease Research Laboratory, St. Joseph’s College, 680121 Irinjalakuda, India
5CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research (CSIR-IITR), 226001 Lucknow, India




Article history:
Received: August 29, 2017
Accepted: January 25, 2018
cc



Key words:
enzymes, food industry, brewing, baking, juice clarification




Summary:
The use of enzymes or microorganisms in food preparations is an age-old process. With the advancement of technology, novel enzymes with wide range of applications and specificity have been developed and new application areas are still being explored. Microorganisms such as bacteria, yeast and fungi and their enzymes are widely used in several food preparations for improving the taste and texture and they offer huge economic benefits to industries. Microbial enzymes are the preferred source to plants or animals due to several advantages such as easy, cost-effective and consistent production. The present review discusses the recent advancement in enzyme technology for food industries. A comprehensive list of enzymes used in food processing, the microbial source of these enzymes and the wide range of their application are discussed.




*Corresponding author:  email3  sindhurgcb@gmail.com, sindhufax@yahoo.co.in




Paper was presented at the 7th International Forum on Industrial Bioprocessing - IFIBiop 2017, May 21-24, 2017, Wuxi, PR China

getpdf  NLM-PubMed-Logo  doi: 10.17113/ftb.56.01.18.5477 

Production of Pectinase from Bacillus sonorensis MPTD1



Anju Mohandas1small orcid_display_4pp, Sindhu Raveendran1*small orcid_display_4pp
, Binod Parameswaran1small orcid_display_4pp, Amith Abraham1small orcid_display_4pp, Raj S. R. Athira1, 2small orcid_display_4pp,
Anil Kuruvilla Mathew1small orcid_display_4pp and Ashok Pandey3small orcid_display_4pp

 



1Microbial Processes and Technology Division, CSIR-National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology (CSIR-NIIST), 695019 Trivandrum, India
2Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (AcSIR), CSIR-NIIST, 695019 Trivandrum, India
3CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research (CSIR-IITR), 226001 Lucknow, India




Article history:
Received: August 18, 2017
Accepted: February 5, 2018
cc



Key words:
pectinase, fermentation optimization, Bacillus sonorensis




Summary:
Seven isolates from spoiled fruits and vegetables were screened for pectinase production using pectin agar plates and the most efficient bacterial strain, MPTD1, was identified as Bacillus sonorensis. Optimisation of various process parameters was done using Plackett-Burman and Box-Behnken designs and it was found that parameters like yeast extract, K2HPO4, incubation time, NaNO3 and KCl have a negative impact on pectinase production. Parameters like pH and MgSO4 and pectin mass fractions have a positive impact on pectinase production. The maximum obtained enzyme activity was 2.43 (μM/mL)/min. This is the first report on pectinase production by Bacillus sonorensis.




*Corresponding author:  tel3  +914712515426
                                                     fax2  +914712491712
                                                      email3  sindhurgcb@gmail.com, sindhufax@yahoo.co.in



Paper was presented at the 7th International Forum on Industrial Bioprocessing - IFIBiop 2017, May 21-24, 2017, Wuxi, PR China

getpdf  NLM-PubMed-Logo  doi: 10.17113/ftb.56.01.18.5456 

Dye-Affinity Nanofibrous Membrane for Adsorption of Lysozyme: Preparation and Performance Evaluation


Steven Sheng-Shih Wang1small orcid_display_4pp, Szu-Ming Yang1small orcid_display_4pp, Ai Hsin1small orcid_display_4pp and Yu-Kaung Chang1,2*
small orcid_display_4pp


1Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan, ROC
2Department of Chemical Engineering, Graduate School of Biochemical Engineering, Ming Chi University of Technology, Taishan Dist., 24301 New Taipei, Taiwan, ROC




Article history:
Received: July 31, 2017
Accepted: October 7, 2017
cc



Key words:
nanofibre, polyacrylonitrile, dye-affinity membrane, lysozyme, adsorption




Summary:
Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibrous membrane was prepared by an electrospinning technique. After heat treatment and alkaline hydrolysis, the weak ion exchange membrane was grafted with chitosan molecule and then covalently immobilized with a Cibacron Blue F3GA (CB). Fibre diameter, porosity and pore size of the membrane and immobilized dye density were characterized. Furthermore, the membrane was applied to evaluate the binding performance of lysozyme under various operating parameters (pH, chitosan mass per volume ratio, dye concentration, ionic strength and temperature) in batch mode. The experimental results were directly applied to purify lysozyme from chicken egg white by membrane chromatography. The results showed that the capture efficiency, recovery yield and purification factor were 90 and 87 %, and 47-fold, respectively, in a single step. The binding capacity remained consistent after five repeated cycles of adsorption-desorption operations. This work demonstrates that the dye-affinity nanofibrous membrane holds great potential for purification of lysozyme from real feedstock.




*Corresponding author:  tel3  +886229089899 ext. 4668
                                           fax2  +886229083072
                                            email3  ykchang@mail.mcut.edu.tw




Paper was presented at the 7th International Forum on Industrial Bioprocessing - IFIBiop 2017, May 21-24, 2017, Wuxi, PR China

getpdf  NLM-PubMed-Logo  doi: 10.17113/ftb.56.01.18.5464 

Optimization of Process Parameters for the Production of γ-Linolenic Acid by Cunninghamella elegans CFR C07 in Submerged Fermentation


Parvathy Sree Varma1#small orcid_display_4pp, Salini Chandrasekharan1#small orcid_display_4pp
, Govindarajulu Venkateswaran2small orcid_display_4pp, Santhosh Rajendran2small orcid_display_4pp, Kiran Kumar Mallapureddy1small orcid_display_4pp, Ashok Pandey1,3small orcid_display_4pp and Binod Parameswaran1*small orcid_display_4pp




1Microbial Processes and Technology Division, CSIR-National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology, Industrial Estate P.O., 695019 Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India
2CSIR-Central Food Technological Research Institute, Kajjihundi, 570020 Mysore, Karnataka, India
3CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, 31 MG Marg, 226001 Lucknow, India




Article history:
Received: August 4, 2017
Accepted: January 17, 2018
cc



Key words:
γ-linolenic acid, submerged fermentation, Cunninghamella elegans, fatty acid production




Summary:
The production of γ-linolenic acid (GLA) by the fungus Cunninghamella elegans CFR C07 in submerged fermentation was studied. Culture parameters such as carbon source and incubation time were optimized. Four different extraction methods using solvents with acid washed sand, glass beads, lyophilization and Soxhlet extraction were evaluated for improved extraction of lipids from the fungal biomass after fermentation. The GLA production was initially optimized in 250-mL flask and the process was demonstrated in a 3-litre fermentor. The maximum GLA production was 882 mg/L in shake flask culture and 733 mg/L in the fermentor. The study shows that Cunninghamella elegans CFR C07 is a potent organism for the production of GLA under submerged conditions.




*Corresponding author:  tel3  +914712515361
                                                     fax2  +914712491712
                                                      email3  binodkannur@niist.res.in



#
Both authors contributed equally




Paper was presented at the 7th International Forum on Industrial Bioprocessing - IFIBiop 2017, May 21-24, 2017, Wuxi, PR China

getpdf  NLM-PubMed-Logo  doi: 10.17113/ftb.56.01.18.5455

Effects of Formic or Acetic Acid on the Storage Quality of Mixed Air-Dried Corn Stover and Cabbage Waste, and Microbial Community Analysis


Haiwei Ren1,2*small orcid_display_4pp, Cong Wang1
small orcid_display_4pp, Wenguang Fan1small orcid_display_4pp, Bingyun Zhang1small orcid_display_4pp, Zhizhong Li1small orcid_display_4pp and Dong Li3small orcid_display_4pp


1School of Life Science and Engineering, Lanzhou University of Technology, 287 Langongping Road, 730050 Lanzhou, PR China
2Key Laboratory of Complementary Energy System of Biomass and Solar Energy, Gansu Province, 287 Langongping Road, 730050 Lanzhou, PR China
3Key Laboratory of Environmental and Applied Microbiology, Environmental Microbiology Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Science, No. 9, Section 4, Renmin South Road, 610041 Chengdu, PR China




Article history:
Received: July 30, 2017
Accepted: February 1, 2018
cc



Key words:
air-dried corn stover, cabbage waste, mixed ensiling, formic and acetic acids, fermentation quality, microbial community diversity




Summary:
A mixture of air-dried corn stover and cabbage waste was ensiled to preserve lignocellulosic biomass for use as biofuel. Furthermore, the effects of different fresh mass fractions (0.3 and 0.6 %) of formic or acetic acid on the mixed silage quality were evaluated to guarantee its quality. The application of formic or acetic acid prior to mixing the silage led to higher water-soluble carbohydrate fractions than the negative control, indicating that both acids contributed to preservation of water-soluble carbohydrates during storage for 170 days. The dry matter content was also increased after storage from 90 to 170 days. It was found that the content of neutral and acid detergent fibre, cellulose and holocellulose (the sum of cellulose and hemicellulose) in mixed silage treated with formic or acetic acid was significantly lower than that obtained in the negative control. The pH and the ratio of ammoniacal nitrogen to total nitrogen in mixed silage treated with acetic acid also significantly decreased. Furthermore, the addition of formic or acetic acid significantly weakened the fermentation intensity of lactic acid, depending on the ratio of lactic to acetic acid, as well as the ratio of lactic acid to total organic acids. The number of bacterial species and their relative abundance shifted during silage mixing, wherein microbial communities at phylum level mainly consisted of Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. The dominant bacteria were also observed to shift from Lactobacillus and Enterobacter in presilage biomass to Lactobacillus and Paralactobacillus. Specifically, Enterobacter disappeared after 130 days of storage. In conclusion, the addition of a low dose of acetic acid to fresh mass (0.3 %) could effectively improve the fermentation quality and is conducive to the preservation of the organic components.




*Corresponding author:  tel3  +869312976385
                                           fax2  +869312973367  
                                            email3  rhw52571119@163.com




Paper was presented at the 7th International Forum on Industrial Bioprocessing - IFIBiop 2017, May 21-24, 2017, Wuxi, PR China

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