getpdf NLM PubMed Logo https://doi.org/10.17113/ftb.58.02.20.6223 Supplement

Lovastatin Production by Aspergillus sclerotiorum Using Agricultural Waste

Jutarut Iewkittayakorn1*orcid tiny, Kannika Kuechoo1orcid tiny, Yaowapa Sukpondma2orcid tiny, Vatcharin Rukachaisirikul2orcid tiny, Souwalak Phongpaichit3orcid tiny and Wilaiwan Chotigeat1,4orcid tiny

1Department of Molecular Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, Faculty of Science, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, 90112 Songkhla, Thailand

2Department of Chemistry and Center of Excellence for Innovation in Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, 90112 Songkhla, Thailand

3Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, 90112 Songkhla, Thailand

4Center for Genomics and Bioinformatics Research, Faculty of Science, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, 90112 Songkhla, Thailand

Article history:

Received: 29 January 2019

Accepted: 15 July 2020

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Key words:

agricultural waste, Aspergillus sclerotiorum, lovastatin, solid-state fermentation, soya bean sludge

Summary:

Research background. Lovastatin is a well-known drug used to reduce hypercholesterolaemia. However, the cost of lovastatin production is still high. Therefore, alternative low-cost carbon sources for the production of lovastatin are desirable.

Experimental approach. Four different agricultural wastes, namely corn trunks, rice husks, wild sugarcane, and soya bean sludge, were tested separately as substrates to produce lovastatin using a new fungal strain, Aspergillus sclerotiorum PSU-RSPG 178, under both submerged and solid-state fermentation (SSF).

Results and conclusions. Of these substrates and cultivation systems, soya bean sludge gave the highest lovastatin yield on dry mass basis of 0.04 mg/g after 14 days of SSF at 25 °C. Therefore, the soya bean sludge was separately supplemented with glucose, wheat flour, trace elements, palm oil, urea and molasses. The addition of the palm oil enhanced the lovastatin yield to 0.99 mg/g. In addition, the optimum conditions, which gave a lovastatin yield of (20±2) mg/g after 18 days of SSF, were soya bean sludge containing 80 % moisture (dry basis) at a ratio of soya bean sludge (g) to mycelial agar plugs of 1:4, and a ratio of soya bean sludge (g) to palm oil (mL) of 1:2. Besides, the lovastatin yields obtained from SSF using fresh or dry soya bean sludge were not significantly different.

Novelty and scientific contribution. We conclude that A. sclerotiorum PSU-RSPG 178 has a good potential as an alternative strain for producing lovastatin using soya bean sludge supplemented with palm oil as a carbon source.

*Corresponding author: +6674288791
  +6674288777
  jutarut.p@psu.ac.th

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