getpdf  NLM-PubMed-Logo  https://doi.org/10.17113/ftb.56.03.18.5285 

Multifunctional Role of the Whey Culture Medium in the Spray Drying Microencapsulation of Lactic Acid Bacteria

 


Stephania Aragón-Rojas1orcid tiny, María Ximena Quintanilla-Carvajal1*orcid tiny and Humberto Hernández-Sánchez2orcid tiny

 


1Biosciences Doctoral Program, Faculty of Engineering, University of La Sabana, Common Campus Bridge, Km. 7 Bogota North Freeway, Chía, 140013 Cundinamarca, Colombia
2National School of Biological Sciences, National Polytechnic Institute, Av. Wilfrido Massieu esq. Cda. M. Stampa, UP Adolfo López Mateos, 07738 Ciudad de Mexico, Mexico

 

 


Article history:
Received: 5 April 2017
Accepted: 20 June 2018
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Key words:
carrier material, Lactobacillus spp., microencapsulation, spray drying, whey

 

 


Summary:
This study aims to evaluate the multifunctional role of whey culture medium during the spray drying microencapsulation of Lactobacillus fermentum K73. Whey culture medium containing growing microorganisms served to hydrate different mixtures (gum arabic, maltodextrin and whey). We evaluated the use of these mixtures as carbon sources and their protective effects on simulated gastrointestinal conditions. The optimal mixture was spray-dried while varying the outlet temperature and atomizing pressure using a response surface design. These conditions served to evaluate microorganism survival, tolerance to gastrointestinal conditions in vitro, physicochemical properties, morphometric features and stability at 4, 25 and 37 °C. Lactobacillus fermentum K73 replicated in the carrier material. Bacterial change cycles were (–1.97±0.16) logCFU/g after the drying process and (–0.61±0.08) and (–0.23±0.00) log CFU/g after exposure of the capsules to simulated gastric pH and bile salt content, respectively. The physicochemical properties and morphometric features were within the normal ranges for a powder product. The powder was stable at a storage temperature of 4 °C. The spray drying of the whey culture medium with growing microorganisms using the optimized drying conditions was successful. This study demonstrates the use of whey culture medium as a component of carrier material or as the carrier material itself, as well as its protective effects during drying, under simulated gastrointestinal conditions, and at varied storage temperatures.

 

 


*Corresponding author: tel3 +5718615555 ext. 25216
                                          email3  maria.quintanilla1@unisabana.edu.co

getpdf  NLM-PubMed-Logo  https://doi.org/10.17113/ftb.56.03.18.5540 

A Novel Antidiabetic Food Produced via Solid-State Fermentation of Tartary Buckwheat by L. plantarum TK9 and L. paracasei TK1501

 

Lei Feng§orcid tiny, Yufeng Xie§orcid tiny, Chenmiao Pengorcid tinyYuxiaoxue Liuorcid tiny and Haikuan Wangorcid tiny*

 

 


State Key Laboratory of Food Nutrition and Safety, College of Biotechnology, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, No. 29 of 13th Avenue, Tianjin, PR China

 

 


Article history:
Received: 28 September 2017
Accepted: 15 May 2018 
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Key words:
Tartary buckwheat, fermentation, α-glucosidase inhibition, dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibition, antidiabetic

 

 


Summary:
Diabetes is a chronic metabolic disease characterized by hyperglycaemia and a number of potential complications that significantly reduce the patient’s quality of life. In this study, we produced an antidiabetic functional food from Tartary buckwheat fermented by Lactobacillus plantarum TK9 and L. paracasei TK1501. The results of an orthogonal experimental design indicated that the three factors with the largest effects on the growth of L. plantarum TK9 and L. paracasei TK1501 in solid-state fermentation (SSF) were in the order: water ratio>inoculum size>time of fermentation. Under the optimal fermentation conditions comprising a 1:1.5 water ratio, 24 h of SSF and a 10CFU/g inoculum, the Tartary buckwheat fermented by L. plantarum TK9 and L. paracasei TK1501 yielded viable probiotic counts of (2.3±0.7)·10and (3.3±0.4)·109 CFU/g, respectively. The nutritional potential, as well as antioxidant and antidiabetic properties of ethanolic extracts from fermented Tartary buckwheat were investigated. The highest α-glucosidase inhibitory activity, with an IC50 of 0.51 mg/mL, was present in Tartary buckwheat fermented by L. plantarum TK9. However, Tartary buckwheat fermented by L. paracasei TK1501 had the highest dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) inhibition, with an IC50 of 2.47 mg/mL. Therefore, fermentation by both L. plantarum TK9 and L. paracasei TK1501 has the potential to yield a product that can help regulate the levels of blood glucose as part of a diabetic diet.

 

 


*Corresponding author: tel3 +862260601958
                                          fax2 +862260602298
                                          email3  hkwang@aliyun.com

§These authors contributed equally to this work

getpdf  NLM-PubMed-Logo  https://doi.org/10.17113/ftb.56.03.18.5348 

Lignin-Degrading Abilities of Novel Autochthonous Fungal Isolates Trametes hirsuta F13 and Stereum gausapatum F28

 

Jelena Jović*orcid tiny, Aneta Buntićorcid tiny, Neda Radovanovićorcid tiny, Bojan Petrovićorcid tiny and Ljiljana Mojovićorcid tiny

 

 


University of Belgrade, Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, Department for Biochemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Karnegijeva 4, RS-11120 Belgrade, Serbia

 

 


Article histoy:
Received: 18 May 2017
Accepted: 26 March 2018
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Key words:
Trametes hirsuta, laccase, manganese peroxidase, Stereum gausapatum, lignin removal, white-rot fungi

 

 


Summary:
The aim of this research is to isolate and identify fungi with high lignin-degrading abilities that are autochthonous to southern Serbian region. Two novel fungal isolates identified as Trametes hirsuta F13 and Stereum gausapatum F28 were selected to assess their ligninolytic enzyme activities and the efficiency of lignin removal from beech wood sawdust. Obtained results show that both isolates are good sources of industrially valuable enzymes with a potential for application in various biotechnological and industrial processes. Both isolates showed laccase, manganese-dependent peroxidase, and versatile peroxidase activities, while only S. gausapatum F28 had lignin peroxidase activity. This is the first record of the ability of S. gausapatum species to produce lignin peroxidase. T. hirsuta F13 showed higher laccase activity than S. gausapatum F28, while S. gausapatum F28 had higher manganese peroxidase activity. Also, T. hirsuta F13 exhibited much higher laccase activity under submerged cultivation conditions than solid-state cultivation conditions, which is rare for fungi. This is important for industrial processes since the submerged fermentation is a dominant technique in industry. The test of the efficiency of lignin removal showed that both isolates are efficient lignin decomposers. After five weeks of incubation on beech wood sawdust, the total lignin losses were 33.84 % with T. hirsuta F13 and 28.8 % with S. gausapatum F28.

 

 


*Corresponding author: tel3 +381628766059
                                          email3  yowitch@gmx.com

getpdf  NLM-PubMed-Logo  https://doi.org/10.17113/ftb.56.03.18.5318 

Linseed (Linum usitatissimum) Oil Extraction Using Different Solvents

 

Guilherme Sabadin Piva1orcid tiny, Thiago André Weschenfelder1orcid tinyElton Franceschi2orcid tiny, Rogério Luis Cansian1orcid tiny, Natalia Paroul1orcid tiny and Clarice Steffens1*orcid tiny

 

 


1Department of Food Engineering, URI Erechim, Av. Sete de Setembro 1621, 99700-000, Erechim, RS, Brazil
2Colloidal System Research Center (NUESC), Research and Technology Institute (ITP), Tiradentes University (UNIT), 49032-490, Aracaju, SE, Brazil

 

 


Article history:
Received: 24 April 2017
Accepted: 23 May 2018 
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Key words:
linseed oil, fatty acids, extraction yield, extraction methods, oil quality

 

 


Summary:
This work aims at characterizing linseed oil obtained using different extraction methods (hexane, subcritical propane and pressurized ethanol), and comparing the results with commercial linseed oil extracted by cold mechanical press method. An experimental design helped to evaluate temperature and pressure effects on the oil extraction using propane and ethanol. Gas chromatography assisted in evaluating the essential fatty acids. There were no significant differences among the ω-3, 6 and 9 fatty acids from linseed oil obtained using the different extraction methods. Only the acidity of linseed oil extracted by subcritical propane (0.956 %) showed significant differences among the physicochemical parameters. Extraction using organic solvent (Soxhlet) gave a 36.12 % yield. Extraction using subcritical propane at 107 Pa and 40 °C for 1.5 h gave a better yield (28.39 %) than pressurized ethanol (8.05 %) under similar conditions. Linseed oil extraction using subcritical propane was economically viable, resulting in a 124.58 US$/L product cost. The results present subcritical propane extraction as a promising alternative for obtaining linseed oil at mild temperature and pressure conditions, without losing quality and quantity of fatty acids such as ω-3, 6 and 9.

 

 


*Corresponding author: tel3 +555435209000
                                          fax2 +555435209090
                                          email3  claristeffens@yahoo.com.br

getpdf  NLM-PubMed-Logo  https://doi.org/10.17113/ftb.56.03.18.5495 

Inhibition of Enzymatic and Oxidative Processes by Phenolic Extracts from Spirulina sp. and Nannochloropsis sp.

 

Priscila Tessmer Scaglioni1orcid tiny, Larissa Quadros1orcid tiny, Mariane de Paula1orcid tiny, Vitor Badiale Furlong2orcid tiny, Paulo César Abreu3orcid tiny and Eliana Badiale-Furlong1orcid tiny

 

 


1Laboratory of Food Science and Mycotoxins, School of Chemistry and Food, Federal University of Rio Grande (FURG), Itália Avenue, km 8, Bairro Carreiros, Rio Grande, RS, Brazil
2Chemical Engineering Department, Federal University of São Carlos (UFSCAR), Rod. Washington Luiz, km 235, SP 310, São Carlos, SP, Brazil
3Laboratory of Ecology of Phytoplankton and Marine Microorganisms, Aquaculture and Marine Biotechnology Center, Federal University of Rio Grande, Street of Hotel 2, Querência, Rio Grande, RS, Brazil

 

 


Article history:
Received: 31 August 2017
Accepted: 19 April 2018 
cc

 


Key words:
amylase, antioxidant activity, peroxidase, phenolic extracts, Nannochloropsis sp., Spirulina sp.

 

 


Summary:
This study investigates the capacity of phenolic extracts from microalgae Nannochloropsis sp. and Spirulina sp. to inhibit enzymes and free radical activities, intending to find an innovative way to slow down food damage. HPLC-UV and LC-MS/MS served to determine and confirm, respectively, the phenolic acid profiles in the soluble methanolic (free phenolic) and ethanolic (conjugated phenolic) fractions, and after hydrolysis (bound phenolic fractions). Different procedures measured the antioxidant activity of the extracts to estimate the minimal concentration for the protective effect, stability and versatility of activity. The ability to inhibit the oxidative process (ABTS and DPPH), α-amylase and peroxidase activities were estimated as specific inhibition (%/(min·μg)) for better comparison between the phenolic sources. The phenolic acid mass fractions in the free phenolic extracts from Spirulina sp. and Nannochloropsis sp. were 628 and 641 μg/g, respectively. Phenolic extract from Nannochloropsis sp. showed the highest value of ABTS inhibition (1.3 %/(min·μg)) and highest inhibition of peroxidase activity (0.4 %/(min·μg)). The extract from Spirulina sp. was a better inhibitor of α-amylase activity (0.07 %/(min·μg)). Therefore, the phenolic extracts from the edible microalgae may be applied in food industry as natural protector against endogenous and exogenous hydrolytic and oxidative processes.

 

 


*Corresponding author: tel3 +555332757387
                                          email3  priscilascaglioni@gmail.com

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